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Greenland step by step

Updated: Aug 4, 2022

Our stations in the magical land of Greenland.

Carlos Santaella Martinez, Cristiano Segnini and Thomas Panagiotopoulos in Greenland.
Carlos Santaella Martinez, Cristiano Segnini and Thomas Panagiotopoulos in Greenland.

Day 28/29/30 - 30 July 2022 – NUUK

On 30th of July, they finally made it to NUUK after 5.30 hours of sailing. For the first time, they had no fog or patches of ice on their route. Only a few icebergs, which are no longer a problem as they have become completely familiar with their impressive appearance.

Arriving at NUUK, a group of friends were waiting for the Ribbing for Arctic crew, who took the boat out of the water at an impressively fast pace, and in no time, a general engine service was done, as they have already done 150 hours.

The Rib of the mission in Nuuk Port.
The Rib of the mission in Nuuk Port.

Carlos Santaella Martinez, Cristiano Segnini and Thomas Panagiotopoulos in Greenland.
Carlos Santaella Martinez, Cristiano Segnini and Thomas Panagiotopoulos in Greenland.

Day 31/32 - 2 August 2022 - ILULISSAT

Yesterday, at 3pm the crew arrived at the Sermermiut Glacier in Ilulissat. It is the most productive glacier in the Northern Hemisphere, its large icebergs traveling south into the Atlantic ocean and reaching very low latitudes. It is even assumed that the iceberg that sank the Titanic, started from the Ilulissat glacier.

The Ribbing for Arctic team send us truly incredible and breathtaking images from this area.


The Ribbing for Arctic crew in Ilulissat.
The Ribbing for Arctic crew in Ilulissat.

Day 33/34 - 4 August 2022 - QAANAAQ

Thomas Panagiotopoulos, writing about the mission: "August 2, Tuesday, at 11 o'clock in the morning we started for the north. For two days the weather conditions were predicted to be very good and we didn't want this opportunity to be lost. So we put the northernmost point that we had planned as our final destination. The village of Qaanaaq, which is the northernmost settlement in Greenland and the closest to the North Pole. We pressed ourselves. We were determined to try with all our strengths to succeed. 675 nautical miles to Qaanaaq. 28 hours of continuous, dynamic sailing at cruising speeds of 30-35 knots. It wasn't easy. We didn't get more than two hours of sleep each. Many times we felt exhausted, our head felt heavy and drooped while our eyes often closed automatically. On the other hand, I wanted to fulfill one more of my dreams. I've always had a huge complaint about the beloved Aegean sunset that lasts so little. But now I was in the Arctic Circle and I had the Midnight Sun on my side. In the Arctic Circle, it never gets dark during this period. At 10 p.m., the sun tilts toward the west but stands there, above the horizon, for several hours, then begins to rise again. It is truly magical to travel for many hours through the purple colors of the almost permanent sunset. I felt like an active part of a magical picture. I traveled for hours in it. I was soaking up every moment with all my senses. I wasn't concerned at all about when we would reach our destination. I lived for the journey. Within a burning horizon. And the Journey… was traveling me!

I was literally lost in distant crimson parallels… Somewhere within the Arctic Circle!"

 

During our mission there will be a 24-hour monitoring of our route by SmartBoat, which generates a daily report with the routes of our boat. You will be able to see live, where we are with the boat at any time during our journey. You can check in real-time the position of our boat : www.smartboat.info/arctic-live


Follow our journey!

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